Africa

Photos of the Week: Wishing Moons, Runway Swim, Shawnee Sunset

Autumn colors in Wales, a ripple maze in Taiwan, “picture day” at a Connecticut school, a funnel cloud in Spain, protests in Kentucky, a socially-distanced beauty pageant in Venezuela, flowers among high-rises in South Korea, surfing in South Africa, and much more. 0…

Free trade zones lead the charge as China reforms

The Chinese government on Monday approved the establishment of three pilot free trade zones (FTZs), in Beijing and Hunan and Anhui provinces, bringing the number of such zones in the country to 21. The decision will help the world’s second-largest economy facilitate its reform and…

330 Elephants in Botswana May Have Died From Toxic Algae

GABORONE, Botswana—The sudden deaths of some 330 elephants in northwestern Botswana earlier this year may have occurred because they drank water contaminated by toxic blue-green algae, the government announced Monday. The elephants in the Seronga area died from a neurological disorder that appears to have…

The Core Lesson of the COVID-19 Heart Debate

Editor’s Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here. Last Monday, when I called the cardiologist Amy Kontorovich in the late morning, she apologized for sounding tired. “I’ve been in my lab infecting heart cells…

The Immigrants Who Created New Possibilities

Of the many questions at stake in this fall’s election, one of the less obvious is this: Will the United States remain a country where someone like Barack Obama or Kamala Harris—a person of color with immigrant parents—is likely to be born? The answer depends,…

Suspected Arms Dealers Moved Millions in Somali Money Transfers, Report Says

NAIROBI—Somali money transfer companies moved more than $3.7 million in cash between suspected weapons traffickers in recent years, including to a Yemeni under U.S. sanctions for alleged militant links, according to a report seen by Reuters. The findings by the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized…

Nigeria: 13-Year-Old Boy Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Blasphemy

Child rights agency UNICEF on Wednesday called for the Nigerian government to “urgently review the case” of a 13-year-old boy sentenced to ten years in prison for blasphemy last month in majority Muslim Kano State, which practices sharia, the Islamic law. 0…

An Orange County Woman’s Journey to Help Persecuted Christians Worldwide

LONG BEACH, Calif.–Gia Chacon, 23, grew up in a devout Christian household in Laguna Niguel, California, with “one foot planted in the world and one foot planted in faith,” she told The Epoch Times. She didn’t always envision her life dedicated to humanitarian efforts, but…

United to Add New Direct US Flights to Africa, India, Hawaii

WASHINGTON—United Airlines said Wednesday it plans to add new non-stop flights to Africa, India, and Hawaii as it reconfigures its network in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The No. 3 U.S. airline said next year it will operate the first direct flights between the…

Africa Struggles with Health Worker Strikes During Pandemic

Health workers across Africa have repeatedly gone on strike since the Chinese coronavirus pandemic began over adverse working conditions. In Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe, doctors and nurses say a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE), no health insurance, and no pay are among the reasons…

The Art of Teaching Writing

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number…

Learning From Black Educators

Editor’s Note: In the next five years, most of America’s most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number…

The Terrifying Inadequacy of American Election Law

Merely voting and counting the votes in this year’s election will be an extraordinary challenge. The country faces the worst public-health crisis in a century, a potentially severe shortage of poll workers, mail-in voting on an unprecedented scale, mounting functional problems at the U.S. Postal…

China Replaces Kenya Envoy for Belt and Road Damage Control

China sent a new ambassador to Kenya in an effort to overhaul its public image amid increasing local scrutiny over Nairobi’s debt obligations to Beijing, the country’s Daily Nation reported this weekend. 0…

Al-shabaab Carries Out Attack in Somalia, US Service Member Injured: AFRICOM

A U.S. service member was injured in Somalia on Monday morning by the terrorist group al-Shabaab, according to a statement from U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). Air Force Col. Col Christopher Karns, a spokesman, said that the soldier is being treated for non-life-threatening injuries. The attack…

Malawi to Open Embassy in Jerusalem

Malawi announced Saturday that it would open an embassy in Jerusalem, making it the third country to do so over the weekend. 0…

In Ruling, Judge Throws Lifeline to Diversity Visa Lottery

SAN DIEGO—A federal judge ordered the Trump administration to resume issuing diversity visas for immigrants from underrepresented countries, partially reversing a pandemic-related freeze on a wide range of immigrant and temporary visas. The United States issues up to 55,000 visas a year to people from…

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.

Scroll to Top